Press Release

Look at what has been written about the slope mowers Spider.

SPIDER IN THE SCOTSMAN DAILY NEWSPAPER

SPIDER IN THE SCOTSMAN DAILY NEWSPAPER

 

State's robot mower allows hands-off lawn care

Agency using radio-controlled machine on steep hillsides

ALBANY - Motorists along Route 85 or Brevator Street in Albany haven't been hallucinating if they've recently seen what looks like a self-propelled robotic lawn mower creeping along some of the steep hillsides near the Harriman State Office Building Campus.

The state Office of General Services' remote-controlled Spider Mower is in its second season of duty at the campus.

"People do stop", OGS spokeswoman Heather Groll said, explaining that motorists who have seen the machine from the Brevator Street area have pulled over to watch the 718-pound aluminum mower do its thing.

The squat yellow-and-black unit - which resembles a fax machine crossed with a Mars lander - is used primarily on steep hillsides that pose dangers to regular push or riding mowers, which pose a risk of flipping over on such terrain.

About the size of a ATV but much squatter with a low center of gravity, the all-wheel drive and all-wheel-steering machine is controlled with a joystick device that looks like an Xbox controller. For those who might worry about the device going rogue, it's programmed to shut off if the signal goes down.

In addition to keeping people off steep hillsides, the mower can chew through weed patches up to 8 feet high.

That‘s a real advantage given seasonal concerns about tick-borne illness that landscapers can be exposed to in such an environment. The mower can also chop through a sapling up to 1 inch in diameter.

Groll said the Spider Mower was developed in the Czech Republic, where a bridge engineer had long puzzled over how to mow hard-to-reach areas such as bridge footings at the bottom of a slope.

Rather than steering the entire machine, the articulated wheels pivot below the mower‘s deck. It uses a Kawasaki motor, and there‘s a built-in winch for extra steep terrain.

These mower also can be used on dam embankments and ski slopes.

Syracuse and Fordham universities have purchased the machines according to the company's website.

Homeowners who have read this far wondering if the unit might be just right for their suburban lawns should be ready for some sticker shock: At a price of $49,000, the cost of the Spider could cover a lifetime of conventional mowers.

 Original article:

http://www.timesunion.com/7day-state/article/Robotic-lawnmower-allows-hands-off-grass-cutting-11305595.php

 

 

 

Spider takes the sting out of mowing

 11th Jul 2017, Senior News, Australia

SWEAT begins to form on the brow, goose bumps shiver up the arm - fear has settled across the backyard.

The wild, long grass covered hill looms like Mount Everest, with dangers lurking for any careless climber.

The engine roars to life, the mower creeps up the bank, tilting further and further on its side until the driver is leaning off the side just to keep it balanced.

Suddenly, the front tyre slips, the machine begins to roll and tipping point, the moment every mower dreads, is reached.

But it didn't have to be like this - not if the driver had a Spider mower.

The remote-controlled machine is transforming the way Australians take the stress out of maintaining potential dangerous properties.

The Czech Republic built machine combines the cutting power of a 9.5 Briggs & Stratton horsepower engine with a 22-inch cutting deck and is as easy as sitting on the back veranda, remote control in hand and letting the Spider do all the work.

"The bigger machines are generally used in commercial applications for roadside maintenance or dam walls, reservoirs," Spider product manager Glenn Dwyer told Seniors News.

"The residential machine (the Mini Spider) does up to a 30-degree slope with a range of 100 metres on the remote control, which is powered by double AA batteries."

But the main feature of the Spider is the near-extinguish of danger to the owner who has risked life and limb on dangerous slopes.

"We have elderly customers that have the mini at the moment who basically live on large acreages that have a lot of slope," Dwyer said.

"They're just getting too long in the tooth to be doing any daredevil, hanging off ride-on manoeuvres.

"And that's the main thing, to remove the operator from the danger of a roll over on a slope."

The Mini features a kill-switch on both the remote and mower, is easy to flip over in the case of spill, has a battery life of over three weeks and, best of all, is easy to set up on delivery.

"In fact, I had a customer purchase one recently, sight unseen, over the phone," Dwyer said.

"Basically we delivered the machine by courier and when it got there, he rang and I talked him through the process and he hasn't looked back."

And the price - the Mini retails at $13,500 with GST - will easily make anyone buying a new mower think twice.

"The only other way to do a slope on a customer's property anywhere near the angle this machine can do, you would need a 4WD ride-on at least," Dwyer said.

"Which you are still sitting on, and that will set you back around $18,000.

"From a cost perspective it's pretty good."

 

For more information on the Spider Mini or to find a dealer, visit www.spider-mower.com.au

 

Original article: https://www.seniorsnews.com.au/news/spider-mini-takes-danger-out-mowing/3199128/

 

 

Mow-na Lisa created on Czech countryside slope

A giant-sized portrait of Leonardo da Vinci's famous Mona Lisa has been created in the Czech countryside at Dolni Kalna, using a pair of Spider mowers on a grass canvas that measured 200 metres by 250 metres.

The grass portrait was created over a period of three days on a hill with a 45-degree gradient. Spider, a Czech-based manufacturer of remote controlled slope mowers, launched its first global social media campaign with the design called "Mow-na Lisa." The process was filmed by Mustard, a Prague-based creative motion picture and digital agency.

Using the latest drone technology, Mustard's video shows how the feat was created. It began with a scale drawing of the famous portrait with reference points transferred to the hillside using laser surveying technology. Skilled Spider operators, including the company's managing director Lubomir Dvorak, mowed the 50,000-square-metre image by taking direction from the video producer.

"We wanted to make a video to raise the profile of our product range and our company on a global stage," Pavlina Novakova, international marketing manager for Spider, said. "The germ of an idea was put forward at one of our regular marketing meetings and was gradually developed over a timescale of six months. We looked for an iconic image that would be recognized around the globe and decided on Leonard da Vinci's most famous work. Not only was da Vinci a great artist, but he was also an exceptional engineer. That connection dovetailed perfectly with the innovative technology in our Spider mowers."

Assisting with the project was Cream, a creative communications agency, based in Prague.

"First, we had to find a suitable location, obtain permission from the landowner and then wait for the perfect weather conditions," Novakova said. "We did consider doing it close to a motorway, but this would have removed the element of surprise for the campaign, as we were convinced many people would take photographs of the completed image and post it on social media before the official launch. We are delighted with the finished video and are hoping it will go viral. So many people were involved in the production and it was a great experience for all of us at Spider to be part of it."

The final video can be viewed at https://youtu.be/_Z9RmTR_P3Y

HERE COMES THE SPIDER ...

Pitchcare Classifieds
When I received an invitation to attend a Spider trip, my initial
reaction was one of ‘no thanks’, as my senses immediately led
my thoughts to that of the eight-legged variety
After a little research, I was excited at the
opportunity to delve deeper into this unique radio
controlled slope mower and off I went to the
Spider headquarters in the Czech Republic.
Having never visited this country before, I expected
to find a few ornate castles, cheap beer and long
stories about its history, along with a modest factory
facility for The Dvořák machinery division who
manufacture the revolutionary Spider. What I didn’t
expect was to approach a very modern, beautiful
and breath-taking factory, built in 2014, following
the success and vision of its founder and owner
Mr. Lubomír Dvořák. The facility is located in the
heart of the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands near the
Pohled village, and its architecture and surrounding
water feature offer a sense of tranquillity and
communion with nature.
The initial Spider concept was developed in 2004
by Lubomír, who had the idea and vision to change
people’s approach to mowing difficult areas, whilst
creating a new niche market... and the Spider was
born. The understanding and forward thinking
from Lubomír meant he would design a machine
unrivalled by any other competitor (due to its strong
patented chassis design), and gain success and
appreciation from consumers and specialists around
the Globe by being the first remote controlled
mower to maintain hillsides.
Jump forward thirteen years and it appears
the infrastructure and experience of the new UK
importer T H WHITE, along with the pioneering
design characteristics of the machine, explains why
Spider is set to take Blighty by storm and cement its
position, not only in the municipal market, but also
in golf, local authorities, railways, sports grounds,
parks and motorways, to name but a few.
What makes Spider so special? The patented
drive system, also known as the Dance step,
together with constant 4-wheel drive, ensures
fantastic manoeuvrability of the mower in all
terrains, great climbing ability and gentle treatment
of grass even in wet or soft terrain. The dancing
step makes the mowers very stable, allowing
omnidirectional mowing and unlimited continuous
turning of all the wheels in full extent of 360o.
Due to the intended use, on steep hillsides and on
weakened terrains, the mowers have a light-weight
structure which means low fuel consumption, low
emissions, high mowing efficiency and easy handling
during transportation and servicing. The ability to
control the mower remotely allows the operator to
stay away from the working area, away from noise
and vibrations, and removes all risk when mowing
on hillsides and in dangerous areas.
The unique drive system allows the mowers to
work on extremely steep slopes with an incline
up to 40o. The integrated hydraulic winch then
increases the climbing ability to an incredible 55o
which sometimes cannot even be walked on.
The mowers are available in three sizes which
differ in mowing width, cutting height, engine
power, number of blades and available accessories.
Spider Mini
The smallest in the range is designed for semiprofessional
use, where an operator needs to mow
sloping land or areas with minimum space for
manoeuvring, such as corporate premises, gardens
and cemeteries.
Spider ILD01
This machine is designed for full professional use
and is intended for terrains with restricted access
and extensive mowing of large areas such as golf
courses, parks, sports facilities and hillsides etc.
Spider ILD02
Also designed for full professional use, this machine
is ideal for steep, inaccessible or long-term
unmaintained areas as well as applications requiring
high quality frequent mowing. This model is also
equipped with an option of skid steering to allow
the mower to turn around its vertical axis which
also simplifies handling.
When watching the demonstration of these
machines, the benefits and ease of use seemed a
little too good be true, so I immediately started to
panic that I’m not adept in Call of Duty and that
my joystick skills would not be up to scratch. How
wrong I was! The remote control was ergonomic,
intuitive, really easy to use and it became obvious
how the safety and comfort of being at a safe
distance from the machine in use is invaluable.
I found, even with me at the control, the drive
system allows for every move to be productive
and eliminates loss of time caused by turning the
mower, positioning it in the next line or by mowing
around obstacles. The Spider ILD02 can replace as
many as fifteen workers with brushcutters or one
boom mower carried by a tractor. When mowing,
the grass is mulched so the need to transport and
dispose of the grass collected is eliminated.
Don’t be fooled by thinking this machine is
futuristic and gimmicky... it’s nothing of the sort!
It’s a unique product, developed by a passionate
company with a strong emphasis on safety,
versatility, comfort and customer support.


SPIDER IN BENELUX

 
 
 
 

SPIDER

May 10, 2017 Posted by In News Comments 0

As part of a continuing strategy to strengthen distribution across Europe, Dvorak, the Czech manufacturer of Spider mowers, has appointed Machines4Green of Hooghalen in the Netherlands as their distributor for the BeNeLux region. Machines4Green, which recently changed ownership and is now owned by Roy Gerrits,  were previously Spider distributors for the Netherlands, but this new agreement has extended their territory to include Belgium and Luxembourg.

Machines4Green specializes in compact and highly maneuverable equipment for the sustainable green space and agricultural sectors and serves these professional markets with expert guidance and excellent after-sales support. www.spider-cz.com

SALES AND MARKETING TEAM ENHANCED AT SLOPE MOWER MANUFACTURER DVORAK

Sales and marketing teams enhanced at slope mower manufacturer Dvorak

To support a progressive and structured sales initiative in northern Europe and across the Americas, The Dvorak svahove sekacky Ltd., Czech manufacturers of the Spider range of remote controlled slope mowers, has added new members to its sales and marketing teams.

Peter Driver has been appointed as public relations consultant and will be based in the UK, working closely with the international sales and marketing teams at the company’s modern head office and manufacturing premises in Pohled, Czech Republic. He will be responsible for raising the profile of the Spider brand across northern Europe and the Americas.

He has been associated with the turfcare industry for over 20 years having recently retired following a career at Ransomes Jacobsen, the international turf maintenance equipment manufacturer, based in Ipswich, UK.

Commenting on the appointments, Lubomír Dvořák, founder and managing director of the Dvorak company said: “We are delighted that we have persuaded Peter out of retirement to join us as at this exciting time for our business. We have recently changed our distribution in the UK and are now represented by T H WHITE Machinery Imports Ltd. We have also appointed Nick Penn as our northern European sales manager, while Jason Bristow now heads up our Americas sales operation supported by Lubor Hladik, international sales manager.

“We have appointed two new distributors in Canada to maximise the potential in this area and have also consolidated our USA business, Slope Care, which is now majority owned by us. We have some exciting new products coming to market over the next year and are determined to significantly grow our business as we approach 2020. These recent appointments and changes to our distribution demonstrate that we will enhance our position as the global leader in remote controlled mowing.”

The Dvorak – svahove sekacky Ltd. was founded on July 1, 2004 by Lubomír Dvořák. The patent protected radio controlled Spider slope mower is the dominant product of the company. The revolutionary design of the Spider product range created a new sector into the groundscare market when introduced in 2004. During the past 13 years they have expanded our product portfolio and sales network to over 40 countries around the world.

Spider mowers can be used in multiple applications on golf courses; local authority open spaces; national, regional and local parks; water and river management; roads, rail and highways; waste management sites, airports and military installations; power generation utilities; vineyards and orchards; national heritage sites; skiing and sport resorts; motor sport arenas and solar farms

KAWASAKI ENGINES AND SPIDER LOOK BACK ON 15 YEARS OF REMOTE MOWING

Kawasaki Engines and Spider look back on 15 years of remote mowing

Today the option of remote controlled mowing for hard-to-reach or hazardous terrain is well established. Back at the start of the millennium this was certainly not the case. Professionals faced with steep inclines simply had to do their best with conventional technology, or at worst employ dangerous practices to ensure hillsides weren’t neglected.

That all changed 15 years ago thanks to the vision of Lubomir Dvorak founder of DVORAK – svahove sekacky s.r.o., the Czech company who created Spider mowers. It was Lubomir’s invention of the first remote controlled mowers designed to cope with steep slopes and uneven terrain, that introduced a new, and more importantly safer way of working to groundscare professionals.

Lubomir said: “In the beginning it wasn’t as easy to open minds to the idea of the Spider as you might think. Ideas of how mowing should be done were very entrenched. However, once they saw the manoeuvrability of the mower and ease of remote operation, the benefits became clear”.

Since the start of production in 2004, Spider have chosen Kawasaki Engines to power their professional grade mowers, the ILD01 and ILD02. This year Kawasaki Engines celebrate their own milestone of 60 years of engine production, and their collaboration with Spider remains one of which they are particularly proud.

Jack Ford, senior product manager at Kawasaki Engines Europe, said: “We have huge respect for what Lubomir and his team have developed. Not only did they create a pioneering product, but their continual commitment to technical innovation, state-of-the-art design and high quality components means that they have remained at the forefront of their market and deservedly developed a reputation for one of the most innovative groundscare companies in the world”.

Lubomir is equally complimentary about the power solution provided by Kawasaki’s FS541V and FS691V currently fitted in the ILD01 and ILD02 respectively. “Kawasaki’s FS engines are built for durability and reliable performance day in, day out. This is important for the demanding environments that our Spider mowers are expected to work in”, said Lubomir.

“Low fuel consumption and high torque are vital for us, as well as the ability of the engines to perform at steep operating angles. A key feature of our Spiders is that they can mow on inclines of up to 55 degrees using the integrated hydraulic winch. This gives us a market-leading advantage and Kawasaki’s pressurised lubrication system allows this to be possible.”

Kawasaki are keen to credit the efforts of their Czech Distributor Asko KC s.r.o. in developing the relationship with Spider in the early days. “The team at Asko had a huge part to play in Spider’s development at the beginning and in finding the best engine solution for the product”, added Jack Ford. “Months of testing were carried out by them to ensure that all parties were 100% happy with the engine fitment. It is thanks to the efforts of Asko that we are all working together today.”

With such a successful 15 years behind them, what is next for Spider and their collaboration with Kawasaki Engines?  It seems Lubomir Dvorak is not one to be content with past achievements: “We will continue to innovate and expand”, he said. “In the last five years we have made 127 innovations to the current mowers and we continually look for ways in which we can develop our products. We have also seen significant growth of our Distributor Network so that we are now sold in 40 countries worldwide. Supporting our Network to provide the best possible service for end customers is key”.

Innovation, expansion and support are concepts echoed at Kawasaki who have also expanded their Distributor Network over recent years and now have full coverage across Europe, as well as Distributors in the Middle East and South Africa. Neither has their engine technology stood still: “We are now able to offer OEMs a greater range of power options than ever before, including some of the most advanced technology on the market in the form of our increasing range of EFI models”, commented Jack Ford.

The future for both Kawasaki Engines and Spider looks bright and it certainly seems that they won’t be standing still. If past performance is a predictor of the future, the offering to the turfcare market will look even bigger, better and more technologically advanced.

 
 

HL LANDSCAPES: Smart Landscaping

Whether it is civil landscaping, commercial landscaping, hydromulching / hydroseeding or landscape maintenance, HL has over 40 years experience. From the companies origin in Sydney, HL has grown into a reputable leader in all aspects of civil and commercial landscaping, rehabilitation and maintenance. More

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